Marcus Chester, teacher, teaching, happiness coaching, the happy teacher podcast

We go again

Sometime soon, we go again.

The details will differ.  The locations, rooms, names, times, meetings, and agendas will be wrapped up in the contexts within which we work.  But the essential business will remain.  Namely: how can we do this even better?

To some this is exhausting.  I get it.  I know it can be.  I have been exhausted and wrung out by it all too.  The feeling that nothing is ever good enough.  A feeling that almost always comes from within.  Years ago now a colleague asked me for a link to my tracking spreadsheet.  For a bewildering twenty minutes his words revolved around my head but failed to latch onto the image or idea of a spreadsheet.  I simply couldn’t work out what he meant.  I was exhausted.

I’m not now though.  I haven’t been for a long time.  I’m excited again.  Just like I was for the whole of last year.  And the whole of the year before.

Nothing is permanent.  Other than change.  And I need to continue to welcome this change throughout this next academic year.  It’s change that lies at the heart of a creative classroom.  The room is blank.  The paper is blank.  The air is still.  Nothing happens. And then change.  Change within the first five minutes of a lesson that can, sometimes, last a lifetime.  Think about that.  Think about that and then fail to be anything other than excited.  Deeply satisfied.

Teachers, eh.  We take the stillness, the calm, the silence. And then we shape the thoughts and word of others.  It’s a craft.  We take the absence of knowledge and skills and create understanding.  We move minds.  Challenge.  Support.

And then we go again.

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Feedback

I’m feeding back to Yr11. They have just completed mock examinations in GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature.  The process has several aims.  The broader aim is to provide accurate information about where the cohort is at this point in time.  We know what the targets are; we need to know how are they performing in relation to those.  The narrower aim is to ensure that individual students know their strengths and area for development.  They need clear instruction on how to improve.  This is the most important outcome.

Ok, so far so straightforward.  We all know the evidence: formative assessment with lots of feedback, alongside structured opportunities to use that feedback, enhances achievements.  It seems self-evident.  And yet my through my reading and lurking on various threads I’m not convinced that, as teachers of English, we have fully grasped what feedback is (and isn’t).  Even a short spell on Twitter reveals an abundance of methodological and pedagogical approaches towards what (in my mind anyway) has always been simple.  My theory is that the exponential growth of ways in which we provide feedback is probably linked to a collective nervousness about what constitutes outstanding practice.  I’ve certainly seen many examples of feedback strategies that appear to prioritise form over content; image over impact.  But it’s just a theory…

Of the thousands of lessons that I’ve taught and the hundreds I’ve observed, these are the salient points around which I base practice.

Feedback is not advice or guidance; it’s not a judgement.  Feedback is framed by its reference to goals.  In the English examinations this means that comments should relate to the purpose of the piece.  Any comments can only be considered to be feedback if they relate to being on track towards meeting that goal or if the student needs to think about a different strategy in their attempt to meet that goal.

Feedback needs to be clear; it is not feedback if the student has to work out what they think you mean.  Feedback should be tangible and explicit.  It should be evident what the student needs to do to improve because feedback needs to be actionable.  Students should know what they need to do more or less of next time round in order to improve.

Feedback is for the students only.  Feedback is not the place for a teacher to demonstrate their own subject knowledge, or the place to demonstrate that they are meeting their own performance targets. If the student cannot understand it, if it is too technical, if it is confusing, or if there is simply too much of it it becomes counterproductive.

Feedback is timely; the sooner the student gets it the better.  It doesn’t need to be immediate, but the memory of the learning needs to be fresh and clear.  Timely feedback can be sought in a range of places and contexts.  Peer assessment and review can be really useful in this regard if students have been taught what feedback is and isn’t.

Feedback should be ongoing.  This means that there should be plenty of opportunities to make use of it. Highly performing people in all areas of life have the learned ability to very quickly adapt and adjust their performance in light of feedback.  The value of formative assessment is the fact that it precedes summative assessments.  Their is little (if any value) to feedback if there isn’t the subsequent opportunity to make use of it.

Feedback should be consistent; the more accurate it is the better.  This means (particularly at this point in the development of the new specifications) that teams should be standardising, moderating, sharing, discussing, and focusing on how marks are being allocated.  Avoiding the inevitable “we don’t know what these grades mean” should be a priority.  We know what sophisticated reading and writing looks like; that should be the starting point for embedding consistency.

Time. And time again.

I’ve just spent a coaching session with a highly motivated, energetic and imaginative teacher.  We’ll call her Karen.  She approached me with one main question that I’ve heard countless times before: how do I get to the end of the working day feeling that I am organised and in control?

Some context:

Karen and I have spoken to each other and used FaceTime to connect for four coaching sessions.  It became clear to me during our initial chat that the GROW model for coaching would be useful.  It can be summarised very simply as:GENERIC-GROWCoachingModel

Today’s session was focused on the fourth stage of the process.  Our objective was to leave the session with a clear list of what Karen will do to address her original question, which again was:

How do I get to the end of the working day feeling that I am organised and in control? 

Karen had previously read about and tried some time management techniques, but these tended to be about managing small units of time.  Without a structured day to place these into, such techniques would only ever have limited impact.  Indeed, Karen tried them.  She abandoned them.  She subsequently became more confused, stressed and anxious.

Why was Karen anxious?  What did she say about her day?

Karen felt that she was always on the ‘last minute’ and also felt that she ‘wasted time’ before she even got to work by checking a multitude of social media accounts for updates.  She acknowledged that these accounts were not work related.

Karen felt that she ‘wasted time’ choosing what to wear in the morning and felt that she ‘couldn’t think clearly enough to choose at that time’.

Karen was ‘highly anxious’ about her journey to work and most mornings she hit the peak traffic.

Karen checked her email as soon as she arrived at work and then became anxious that she was ‘not fully prepared’ for her lessons.

Karen would ‘binge-mark/assess’.  The periods when she wasn’t marking caused her anxiety, as did the ‘ever- increasing pile of books’ that were waiting to be marked.

Karen would bring ‘too much work’ home, and write ‘too much’ on her to-do lists.

What will Karen do?

Remember, this is a coaching process, so the following are the ‘WILLS’ that Karen formulated for herself with my help.

I will get up at the same time each day.  I will not use the snooze button.

I will use an alarm clock.  I will not use my phone alarm.

I will leave my phone turned off and will leave it downstairs.

I will prepare what I want to wear the evening before.

I will leave for work at the same time each day.

I will arrive at work at 7:15 AM each day.

I will use the time from 7:15 AM until 8:25 AM to prepare my lessons.

I will use the time from 7:15 AM until 8:25 AM to prepare what I will do in my non-contact time.

I will use the time from 3:30 PM until 5:00 PM to reflect/prepare lessons for the following day (30 minutes) and for marking books (1 hour)

I will use the time from 5:00 PM until 5:15 PM to read email, reply to email

I will leave work at 5:20 PM.

In further sessions we’ll look at how this is helping Karen to implement structure into her day, before looking at some very specific strategies to micro-manage her time.  Karen felt that she needed to see the big picture of her day before looking at the smaller parts.

If you would like to discuss ways in which coaching can help you to be more fulfilled, efficient, and most importantly, happier, then I’d love to hear from you.  You can click here to find out more.

 

 

Excellence

Excellence.

Until recently I thought that it was a word that could not be applied to me.  I could only use it when talking about others.

One day I was asked by someone, as part of a development exercise, to make a list of the things that I had done with my life that could be seen as personal achievements. With a sharp intake of breath I wrote: a happy marriage; two beautiful children; several degrees; a professional career… I stopped in embarrassment. Mine was a positive list of treasures and I felt shallow and self-absorbed to be nothing other than delighted with how my first forty years had panned out. Why then did I not feel qualified to use the E word?

And then it hit me. Those were things that I had accomplished in spite of myself.  My general frame of mind was far from excellent and my previous lifestyle choices and behaviours were not conducive to achieving anything other than an expanding waistline, problematic health and a general feeling that I did not have a grip on myself and my life. To an outsider the outcomes may have appeared successful, but I knew the process was haphazard, patchy, frustrating, and in many respects characterised by self-sabotaging behaviours. My habits were far from excellent and any success that I’d had felt superficial. I’d never really put everything on the line in the pursuit of excellence and I felt like I could give and achieve so much more with a better philosophy.  More importantly, I was far from being happy and this affected every facet of my life including my relationships.

I did something about it; I had to.  When the wheels come off you’ve only two choices: denial or growth.

Through relentless reading, listening, talking and learning I came to realise that personal excellence occurs when goals, attitudes, mindsets and behaviours are aligned.  You can’t fake personal excellence.  This is where I’d had it all wrong: my ‘excellence’ was an act and not a habit.

I came to realise that personal excellence is the grind, the work, the slog.  It’s far from glamorous and it’s never the outcome, it’s the habitual routine. I’m never going to be the world record holder for the marathon, but I can still work hard to become the best runner that I can be; the best teacher that I can be; the best parent that I can be; and the best version of myself that I can be.  This is my understanding of personal excellence: when you’ve risked it all, when you’ve made the sacrifice, when you’ve learned from your mistakes and when you’ve, in the words of Pindar, ‘exhausted the limits of the possible’. It may be cliched, but it really is all about the habit.

In 2015 I decided to make the effort to help others wherever I could.  My aim then (as now) is to reach out to people who feel they would benefit from help to unleash their potential, set free their ambition, and liberate the best version of themselves.  I’ve always approached teaching children in this way.  It is an honour to be able to help others to realise that the most significant barriers to success are most often fictional – unhelpful stories that they and others have repeatedly articulated.  The status quo is always a flimsy narrative.

This blog attempts to capture what I learn along the way.

If, like me, you want to #BeHappier, I’d love to hear from you.  You can click here to find out more.